Komentarz eksperta,Top news

K. Iwanek: The foreign policy of BJP. How much Modi-fication?

[see below for the Polish version]

As 2015 has drawn to an end and as more than a year and a half has passed since the Bharatiya Janata Party (hence  BJP) and its National Democratic Alliance swept into power in India. It is time, therefore, to offer a short summary of its foreign policy so far.

Indian media has mostly paid attention to how often Prime Minister Narendra Modi has went abroad. At the moment of writing he has visited 36 countries. These were: Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Fiji, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mauritius, Myanmar, Mongolia, Pakistan, Republic of Korea, Russia, Seychelles, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, UAE, US and Uzbekistan. Among these, he paid visits to France, Nepal, Russia, Singapore and US twice. Faking News, an Indian forged news website, joked now that the Prime Minister will have to travel to 4 countries each month to be able to visit every state before the end of his tenure, and that shipping companies will now send packages with his plane to ensure speedy delivery. The Opposition claims that these visits do not change much and are a way of evading the problems in the country. In reality, however, there is no denying that while the real benefits of such travels may be of larger, smaller or none, they at least serve the purpose of building India’s and its government’s image, as well as engaging the Indian diaspora.

The intensity and speed of Indian foreign services’ activities have also certainly mattered in another way and in another area: during the evacuation of Indians from Yemen during the civil war. At this time Indian forces provided assistance to citizens of other countries as well. New Delhi also started to be much more active in its bid to become a member of the UN Security Council, once it will be reformed. Earlier India had mainly approached more important countries with this, nowadays it even asks the smallest island states for their support.

Regardless of its real importance, Indian media also have focused on Modi’s more innovative moves, compared to his more traditional predecessors. In 2015 Modi has become the first Indian PM to visit Mongolia. The real surprise, however, came in December that year, when Narendra Modi, having left Afghanistan, landed in Pakistan without any earlier public statement on this visit. The Indian Prime Minister came to Lahore and was seen walking on the red carpet hand with hand with Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. It is obviously not the holding of each other hand’s that was stunning – as this is normal amongst men in many of South Asia’s cultures – but the fact that we have witnessed a sudden and seemingly warm meeting of the heads of two warring states.

The first aspect out of those visible in the media – and the least surprising one if one knows Modi’s ways – was the PR effort surrounding his visits. His meetings with thousands of Non-Resident Indians were likened to rock concerts. Many details were taken care of; a special team was dispatched to the US much before the visit to make the necessary preparation. Before the meeting with the diaspora in Seoul (in which I took part), every participant was supposed to provide his e-mail address during the registration. All of has have later received an e-mail that contained a selection of press comments on Modi’s visit to South Korea.

Let us, however, focus on real politics. Did the new government really Modi-fy India’s foreign policy?

First of all, the ruling BJP is so far not tougher in its foreign policy than its predecessor. The BJP constantly claims that it is its political rival, the Indian National Congress (hence: Congress), that is to mild in its approach towards two rival and neighbouring states, China and Pakistan. However, so far every time BJP was taking over power in India it to a larger degree continued the earlier policies. Just like before, India is seeking cooperation with countries around China like Mongolia, South Korea, Japan and Vietnam. BJP is also trying to develop warmer tries with Beijing, or so it seems; the border dispute is seemingly sidelined. Economy is visibly crucial for Modi’s diplomacy (as it supposed to be). Many representatives of Indian top companies follow the PM, and he is courting, among others, Chinese firms. The new government’s flagship program, Make in India, the aim of which is to bring in FDI to India’s industry, can be seen both as a threat to Chinese economy, as well as a chance for Chinese companies to find new sources of cheap labour.

Not long before winning the elections, Modi, in BJP’s typical language (when in opposition), claimed that he ‘would reply to Pakistan in a language that Pakistan will understand’. It did not sound as if by this he meant inviting Pakistan’s Nawaz Sharif to his swearing-in ceremony in 2014 or walking hand-in-hand with him through the Lahore airport at the of 2015. On the other hand, in between those two events the India-Pakistan dialogue remained largely frozen. From the Indian perspective, the main issue as of now is that Islamabad did not accept the findings of the report on the 2008 terrorist attacks on Mumbai and did not punish Hafeez Saeed, a radical Muslim and the mastermind of this attack. Saeed lives rather freely in Lahore, a city from which the state of Punjab is ruler by Prime Minister Sharif’s brother, and a city in which Modi has recently landed. The period also witnessed period tensions on the border in Kashmir. It is only after Modi’s visit that the two countries seemingly returned to the negotiation table. The Indian PM is to visit Pakistan again in 2016 but certainly it will not be easy to achieve any breakthrough; a few days after Modi’s meeting with Sharif 5 terrorists have attacked an Indian Air Force base in Pathankot, having presumably come from Pakistan.

India has also demonstrated its decisiveness in June 2015. After Naga separatist rebels attacked its army, the soldiers fought back, crossing the border and attacking Naga rebels’ camp in Myanmar (Naga tribes live on both sides of the border and some of the Nagas have been demanding independence from India since the creation of the republic). Yet again, it was not the first time in India’ modern history that such a cross-border attack to Myanmar was conducted. It was certainly a bold and uncommon move, but also a rare one and done in response to a serious attack. The fact that Indians units could cross tells us a bit about India-Myanmar relations. The organization that had attacked Indian forces was the Nationalist Socialist Council of Nagaland (Khaplang) and soon after a the government signed an agreement with another Naga group, the Nationalist Socialist Council of Nagaland (Isak Muivah). The government has stressed both its decisiveness in retaliating against NSCN(K), as well as the importance of the agreement with NSCN(IM). Even this strategy has its roots in the earlier approach of some Congress governments in dealing with separatist groups in the North East: divide the enemy by attacking the radicals and offering a truce to the more moderate factions.

The BJP government has also been not so mild towards its three smaller neighbours: Maldives, Nepal and Afghanistan. At first it seemed that the relations with the rest of South Asia will become warmer. The leaders of all South Asian states were invited for Modi’s swearing-in ceremony and some of his first visits were paid to the neighbours (the first visited country was Bhutan, the third – Nepal, the sixth – Myanmar). In reality, however, the relations with the three above mentioned countries soon became strained, as New Delhi started to flex its muscles again. In all cases the reason were changes happening in these countries, changes that India interpreted as going against its interests and priorities. It is reported that New Delhi was not happy with the arrest and trial of the former president of the Maldives, Mohammad Nasheed, who was considered to be pro-Indian.

A leader considered to be even more pro-Indian is Hamid Karzai, the former president of Afghanistan. However, his successor, Ashraf Ghani, started his tenure by trying to warm up the strained ties with Pakistan. New Delhi again reacted rather coldly by, among others, decreasing its representation at an international conference on economic cooperation in Kabul. The Afghan government has anyway soon clashed with the Pakistani government on some issues and it also presumably sent feelers to New Delhi suggesting to fix the diplomatic damage. This could explain Modi’s visit to Kabul in December 2015.

While India offered assistance to Nepal after the devastating earthquake, New Delhi then was believed to express dissatisfaction over the direction of Nepal’s constitutional process. The constitution is projected to make Nepal a federation (presumably on the Indian model). Therefore, the Himalayan country has been and is witnessing heated debated regarding the borders of the provinces and the political representation to be secured by each community. It is widely believed that India, although it had helped entire Nepal in a number of ways, is in this context mostly concerned with the situation of Madhesis, the inhabitants of the plains of southern Nepal that border India. Amongst all Nepalis, the Madhesis are closest to Indians in terms of language, culture, etc. According the Madhesis, the draft constitution does not secure a satisfying political representation for them. Their protests in Kathmandu and elsewhere have been vehement and turned out bloody. At the same time India has imposed an embargo on fuel sold to Nepal and it is a common assumption – apart from the diplomats who are bound to publicly deny it – that this was done to put pressure on Nepal regarding the constitutional issues. Modi’s government was, therefore, decisive yet again, but in a manner that continues an infamous ‘legacy’ of some earlier Indian governments: pressurizing Nepal by blocking supplies to it. The wanted result for India so far is that Nepal started to purchase more fuel from China. The new Indian government is therefore also repeating an old mistake by pushing Nepal into Beijing’s arms. By the ending months of the year there have been some gossip that even New Delhi reflected upon its treatment of small neighbours. Thus Modi was recently heard talking about sahmati (‘agreement’) with Nepal.

The agreement to swap the border enclaves with Bangladesh was certainly a success, in April 2015 Modi called it even the biggest achievement so far of his foreign policy. However, the same agreement had in fact been earlier blocked by his party when it sat in the opposition benches. At that time it had been proposed by the Congress and its coalition government. The Congress, however, has decided not to be opportunistic and still supported the agreement with its votes when the BJP was in power.

Secondly, the BJP does not let its ideology, the Hindu nationalism, to substantially influence its foreign policy. The Hindu nationalists who are usually in conflict with Muslims have always supported Israel against its Arab Muslim neighbours. Yet, while it was speculated in 2014 that under the new government India may end its support to Palestine in the UN, this has not happened. The President of India, Pranab Mukherjee, visited Israel, but he has visited Palestine as well; Modi, in turn, travelled to the United Arab Emirates. India, no matter who is in power there, cannot ignore its economic relations with some Arabic states, the resources its obtains from there and the millions of Indians that work there. Similarly, while historically the Hindu nationalists had spoken with respect about the Nepali monarchy – the last remaining Hindu kingdom since 1950s – as of now India has in fact supported the democratization and federalization process in Nepal, a process from which there will be probably no return to monarchy.

The relations with other Asian states have also not yet reached a higher level. Though the Prime Minister claimed that regarding South-East Asia he will go from a Look East policy to an Act East policy but we will need to wait for more specific actions. In another part of Asia, Japan is treated particularly warmly by Modi and will probably start major infrastructure projects in India. Yet again, the earlier Congress-led governments have also enjoyed warm ties with Tokyo and opened the country to Japanese investment (the recent famous case is the Delhi Metro). Many eyebrows were raised, however, when before Modi’s visit to South Korea New Delhi claimed that it will enhance its assistance to North Korea and its cooperation with the isolated country.

Hindu nationalists similarly always opposed Communism but accepted the importance of various kinds of assistance that India had received from Moscow. The pro-American element of BJP’s policy is also not that strong as one may assume. In 1996, for instance, the party’s election manigesto criticized Washington for its ‘lack of vision’ of international affairs, and (as usual) for its approach towards the Kashmir issues. Just like the last two governments, Modi’s cabinet is visibly trying to remain at an approximately even distance from Moscow and Washington alike. The US could have felt snubbed were its fighter jets were not chosen in a bid for Indian military, although other deals with American companies followed. Indie did not criticize the secession of Crimea (and hosted a Russian delegation that included a person from Crimea) nor the Russian intervention in Syria. When Modi paid a visited to Moscow in December 2015, new deals on military equipment trade were signed, despite the fact that in 2014 Russia had decided to sell combat copters to Pakistan.

The priorities of New Delhi regarding Europe have not changed. So far, the Prime Minister flew to exactly those three states of the Old Continent that have the biggest economic importance for India: Germany, France and Great Britain. So far, there is unfortunately no sign that New Delhi started to pay more attention to the East European countries, such as Poland.

Narendra Modi w trakcie wizyty zagranicznej w Korei Południowej; Źródło: flickr.com

Narendra Modi w trakcie wizyty zagranicznej w Korei Południowej; Źródło: flickr.com

 

Ile modifikacji? Polityka zagraniczna rządu BJP 2014-2015

Rok 2015 dobiegł końca; minęło także półtora roku od kiedy Bharatiya Janata Party i jej sojusz, National Democratic Alliance, przejął władzę w Indiach. Czas zatem na krótkie podsumowanie jego dotychczasowych działań na polu polityki zagranicznej.

Pierwszym zauważanym (przez media, zaznaczmy) faktem jest zazwyczaj niezwykła częstotliwość zagranicznych podróży premiera Narendry Modiego. W chwili pisania tych słów odwiedził on 36 państw. Były to Afganistan, Australia, Bangladesz, Bhutan, Birma, Brazylia, Chiny, Francja, Fidżi, Irlandia, Japonia, Kanada, Kazachstan, Kirgistan, Malezja, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, Niemcy, Pakistan, Republika Korei, Rosja, Seszele, Singapur, Śri Lanka, Tadżykistan, Turcja, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Wielka Brytania i Zjednoczone Emiraty Arabskie. Ponadto, spośród tych krajów Modi odwiedził Francję, Nepal, Rosję, Singapur i Stany Zjednoczone dwukrotnie. Faking News, indyjska strona z wymyślonymi newsami, żartuje, że premier musi podróżować do 4 państw miesięcznie, by zdążyć zwiedzić wszystkie kraje świata do końca kadencji i że niedługo firmy przesyłkowe będą wysyłały swoje paczki samolotem Modiego, bo tak będzie szybciej. Opozycja twierdzi, że wizyty te niewiele wnoszą i są też sposobem ucieczki od problemów w kraju. W rzeczywistości jednak nie ma wątpliwości, że chociaż realne korzyści z danej wizyty mogą być większe, mniejsze lub żadne, służą one co najmniej budowy rozpoznawalności rządu i Indii w poszczególnych państwach i docierania do indyjskiej diaspory.

Znaczenie miała też z pewnością aktywność i szybkość działania Indii na innym obszarze i w innym zakresie: podczas ewakuacji Indusów z ogarniętego wojną domową Jemenu. W tym wypadku przy sprawnej ewakuacji obywateli Indii udzielono również pomocy reprezentantów innych państw. Nowe Delhi też zaczęło dwoić i troić się w swoich staraniach na rzecz uzyskania członkostwa w Radzie Bezpieczeństwa ONZ (kiedy wreszcie zostanie ona zreformowana). Dotąd Indie zabiegały głównie o wsparcie bardziej znaczących państw, teraz zaś proszą o poparcie nawet najmniejsze, wyspiarskie kraje.

Drugim bardzo zauważalną kwestią – choć również w mediach i niekoniecznie kluczową – jest okazjonalna nieszablonowość polityki zagranicznej Modiego w porównaniu do zachowawczych działań jego poprzedników. W kwietniu tego roku jako pierwszy indyjski premier odwiedził Mongolię. Najbardziej jednak Modi zaskoczył opinię publiczną w grudniu 2015 r., kiedy opuściwszy Afganistan wylądował bez publicznej zapowiedzi w Pakistanie i przeszedł się po rozłożonym na płycie lotniska dywanie trzymając się za ręce z premierem Nawazem Sharifem. Nie chodzi oczywiście o samo trzymanie rąk przez dwóch mężczyzn, które w południowoazjatyckiej kulturze jest normalne, ale o fakt, że nagle spotkali się czołowi reprezentanci dwóch zwaśnionych państw i zamiast zwyczajowego chłodu zdawali się ukazywać daleko idąca serdeczność.

Trzecim medialnym aspektem – i najmniej zaskakującym, gdy zna się strategię Modiego – była promocyjna oprawa jego wizyt. Jego spotkania z tysiącami reprezentantów indyjskiej diaspory przyrównywano do rockowych koncertów. Zadbano o wiele szczegółów. W USA specjalna ekipa przybyła do Nowego Jorku na długo przed Modim, aby wszystko przygotować. Na spotkaniu z diasporą w Seulu, w którym brałem udział, każdy uczestnik podawał swój adres mailowy i po wizycie wszyscy otrzymaliśmy maila podsumowującego cała wizytę w Korei Południowej, ze starannie dobranym wyciągiem komentarzy w prasy.

Przejdźmy jednak do rzeczywistych działań. Czy zabiegi rządu Modiego faktycznie doprowadziły do tąpnięcia w indyjskiej polityce zagranicznej?

Po pierwsze, BJP jak dotąd bynajmniej nie jest znacznie twardsza w swoich działaniach poza krajem. Partia ta tradycyjnie twierdzi, że jej polityczny rywal, Indyjski Kongres Narodowy (odtąd Kongres), traktuje wrogich sąsiadów (Chiny i Pakistan) zbyt łagodnie, ale po dojściu do władzy BJP w dużej mierze kontynuuje i politykę i metody Kongresu. Modi wyraźnie szuka zbliżenia z krajami otaczającymi Chiny jak Mongolia, Korea Południowa, Japonia czy Wietnam, tak samo jednak czyniły ostatnie rządy Kongresu. Poza tym jednak rząd BJP dąży do ocieplenia stosunków z Chinami, albo przynajmniej takie sprawia wrażenie; o ich konflikcie granicznym jest ostatnio raczej cicho. Znaczenie gospodarki dla dyplomacji Modiego jest też widoczne. Jego zamorskim wojażom tradycyjnie towarzyszą najwięksi biznesmeni, a premier Indii namawia także i Chiny do inwestowania. Z drugiej strony jedna z największych kampanii Modiego – Make in India, która ma sprowadzić zagraniczne inwestycje w przemysł ciężki do Indii – może być postrzegana tak jako tworzenie konkurencji dla chińskich firm, jak i tworzenie dla nich szans w poszukiwaniu tańszej siły roboczej. Make in India odniosła już pewne sukcesy, jednakże dość ograniczone; jej warunkiem było też zresztą większe otwarcie różnych gałęzi indyjskiego przemysłu na BIZ i zmiana prawa o nabywaniu ziemi; do tego pierwszego doszło tylko do pewnego stopnia, z  tego drugiego rząd w Nowym Delhi ostatecznie się wycofał.

Niewiele przed dojściem do władzy Modi zapowiadał, że Pakistanowi będzie ,,odpowiadał w języku, który Pakistan zrozumie’’. Wówczas nie wyglądało na to, że językiem tym będzie zaproszenie Nawaza Sharifa na zaprzysiężenie Modiego w 2014 r., a następnie spacerowanie z nim za ręce po lotnisko w Lahaur pod koniec 2015 r. Z drugiej strony, dialog Nowego Delhi z Islamabadem pozostawał w dużej mierze zamrożony między tymi wydarzeniami, ze strony indyjskiej formalnie ze względu na brak akceptacji przez Pakistan raportu w sprawie zamachów w Mumbaju w 2008 r. i brak działań władz pakistańskich wobec Hafeeza Saeeda, radykalnego muzułmanina i organizatora tych zamachów (Saeed żyje dość swobodnie w Lahur, mieście, z którego stanem Pendżab rządzi brat premiera Sharifa i mieście, które niedawno odwiedził sam Modi). Ponownie doszło także do napięć między indyjską i pakistańską armią w spornym Dżammu i Kaszmirze, w sprawie którego brak przełomów. Dopiero niespodziewana wizyta Modiego w Lahaur ma ożywić stosunki dwóch państw w roku przyszłym (w 2016 premier Indii uda się do Pakistanu ponownie).

Indie pokazały też zdecydowanie, gdy w czerwcu 2015 r. ich armia przekroczyła granicę z Birmą, by zaatakować obóz separatystycznych rebeliantów z plemion Nagów (Nagowie żyją po obu stronach granicy, a część indyjskich Nagów od początku istnienia niepodległej republiki Indii domaga się niezależnego państwa Nagów). Po pierwsze jednak, była to tak naprawdę reakcja na wcześniejszy atak tych rebeliantów na armię indyjską, reakcja ostra, ale w rzeczywistości rzadka i nie świadcząca o skupianiu się na konflikcie z Nagami. Sam fakt, że indyjska armia mogła przekroczyć granicę mówi bez wątpienia trochę o stosunkach z Birmą, ale należy dodać, że był to drugi taki znany przypadek w historii tych państw, a zatem i w tej kwestii BJP nie może głosić innowacyjności. Organizacją, która zaatakowała indyjskie wojsko była Nationalist Socialist Council of Nagaland (Khaplang), wkrótce jednak podpisano porozumienie z inną grupą Nagów, Nationalist Socialist Council of Nagaland (Isak Muivah). Rząd równie mocno podkreślił swoje zdecydowanie w ataku na NSCN(K), jak i historyczność porozumienia z NSCN(IM). Strategia ta w istocie jednak ma swoje głębokie korzenie w podejściu rządów Kongresu do problemy separatystycznych grup na Północnym Wschodzie Indii: podzielić przeciwnika przez atakowanie radykałów i równoczesne zaoferowanie ugody bardziej umiarkowanym frakcjom.

Rząd BJP bardziej surowo potraktował natomiast swoich mniejszych sąsiadów: Malediwy, Nepal i Afganistan. Z początku wydawało się, że relacje z resztą Azji Południowej ulegną ociepleniu. Przewodniczących ościennych krajów zaproszono na ceremonię zaprzysiężenia Modiego, a część jego pierwszych wizyt miała miejsce właśnie u sąsiadów (pierwszym w kolejności wizyt krajem był, co ciekawe, mikroskopijny Bhutan, trzecim – Nepal, szóstym – Birma). W rzeczywistości jednak relacje szybko zaczęły być napięte, a Nowe Delhi po raz kolejny zaczęło pokazywać mniejszym krajom swoje twardsze oblicze. Po części wynikało to ze zmian w tych państwach: zmian, które Indie uznały za niekorzystne dla siebie. Chłodno zareagowano na oskarżenia i proces sądowy poprzedniego prezydenta Malediwów, Mohammada Nasheeda, uchodzącego za proindyjskiego. Nasheed został w marcu 2015 r.  skazany na karę więzienia za nakazanie aresztowania sędziego, do czego doszło za jego wcześniejszej prezydentury.

Tym bardziej proindyjski był poprzedni prezydent Afganistanu, Hamid Karzai, jednakże jego następca, Ashraf Ghani, rozpoczął kadencję między innymi od ukłonów w stronę Pakistanu. Nowe Delhi naturalnie zareagowało chłodno, między innymi wysyłając niezbyt znaczącą reprezentację na międzynarodową konferencją o współpracy gospodarczej w Afganistanie, która odbyła się w Kabulu we wrześniu 2015 r. Władze Afganistanu wyraźnie jednak zreflektowały się – jak również doszło do ponownych napięć na linii Kabul-Islamabad – też w grudniu Narendra Modi odwiedził Afganistan.

Chociaż Indie udzieliły pomocy Nepalowi po trzęsieniu ziemi, które zdewastowało ów górski kraj w zeszłym roku, w 2015 r. Nowe Delhi miało negatywnie zareagować na wstępną wersję od dawna pisanej konstytucji Nepalu. Konstytucja ta ma uczynić Nepal federacją (zapewne na wzór Indii) i stąd trwają gorące dyskusje co do tego, jakie granice będą miały nowe prowincje i jaką reprezentację polityczne uzyskają poszczególne wspólnoty. Powszechnie uważa się, że Indie szczególnie dbają o interesy Madheśich, mieszkańców równinnych regionów Nepalu leżących przy granicy z Indiami i najbliższych Indusom z północy pod względem języka, kultury, itd. Według Madheśich wstępna wersja konstytucji Nepalu zapewnia im za małą reprezentację. W Nepalu protesty Madheśich przyniosły krwawe żniwo, a Indie w tym samym okresie wprowadziły embargo na paliwo sprzedawane do Nepalu. Nikt, poza oczywiście przemawiającymi publicznie dyplomatami, nie ma wątpliwości, że krok ten jest formą nacisku na Nepal w sprawie konstytucji. Rząd Modiego zatem zachował się zdecydowanie, ale też po prostu kontynuuje długą i niechlubną ,,tradycję’’ poprzednich rządów: naciskanie na Nepal poprzez blokowanie dostaw różnych dóbr. Jak dotąd wydaje się jednak, że niechcianym rezultatem było zwiększony import Nepalu z Chin. Modi powtarza zatem także błędy poprzednich rządów: nadmierne naciski Indii na Nepal jak zwykle wpychają ten kraj jeszcze bardziej w objęcia Chin, choć zamierzony efekt ma być przecież odwrotny.

Sukcesem było bez wątpienia ostateczne zawarcie podsumowania o wymianie enklaw na granicy z Bangladeszem. W tym wypadku jednak, jak pisałem wcześniej na polska-azja.pl, to właśnie partia BJP blokowała wcześniej to porozumienie; w przeciwnym razie zawarto by je jeszcze za rządów Kongresu i jego koalicji; Kongres zaś nie zachował się oportunistyczne i również za rządów BJP zagłosił za jego zatwierdzeniem. Tym niemniej, w kwietniu 2015 r. Modi ogłosił to porozumienie największym sukcesem swojej polityki zagranicznej.

Po drugie, BJP w niewielkim stopniu dopuszcza, by jej ideologia – hinduski nacjonalizm – przekładała się na kierunek polityki zagranicznej. Antymuzułmańscy hinduscy nacjonaliści tradycyjnie stają po stronie Izraela w sporze z otaczającymi go państwami arabskimi, tymczasem rządy Kongresu zazwyczaj były bliższe tym państwom; formalne relacje dyplomatyczne z Izraelem zawarto dopiero w latach 1990. I chociaż w 2014 r. pojawiły się spekulacje, że nowy indyjski rząd może przestać wspierać Palestynę w ONZ, do niczego takiego nie doszło. Prezydent Indii Pranab Mukherjee odwiedził, co prawda, Izrael, ale premier Modi odwiedził z kolei Zjednoczone Emiraty Arabskie. Indie, niezależnie od tego, kto nimi rządzi, wyraźnie nie mogą zignorować gospodarczych relacji z częścią państw arabskich, w tym płynących stamtąd surowców i inwestycji, jak również milionów pracujących tam Indusów (jak i często negatywnych opinii o Izraelu pośród indyjskich muzułmanów, choć ci na BJP nie głosują). Podobnie, chociaż hinduscy nacjonaliści tradycyjnie wypowiadali się z szacunkiem i podziwem o monarchii nepalskiej, która od lat 50. pozostawała ostatnim hinduskim królestwem na świecie, obecnie Indie w istocie opowiadają się za demokratyzacją Nepalu i systemem federalnym, co prawdopodobnie na dobre uniemożliwi powrót monarchii.

Stosunki z innymi krajami Azji nie przeszły na wyższy poziom. Mimo zapowiedzi Modiego, że względem Azji Południowo-Wschodniej przejdzie od ,,Patrzenia na Wschód’’ (Look East, polityki Indii wobec tego regionu w latach 90.) do ,,Działania na Wschodzie’’ (Act East), na konkrety musimy poczekać. Wyjątkowo ciepło traktowana przez Modiego Japonia prawdopodobnie wkrótce zacznie realizować szeroko zakrojone projekty infrastruktury w Indiach, ale także poprzednie  rządy zadbały o dobre stosunki z Tokio i otwierały się na japońskie inwestycje. Wiele brwi uniosło się natomiast, gdy w tym roku przed wizytą Narendry Modiego w Korei Południowej Indie zapowiedziały rosnącą pomoc dla Korei Północnej i rozwój stosunków gospodarczych z tym izolowanym krajem.

Hinduscy nacjonaliści w podobny sposób zawsze przeciwstawiali się komunizmowi, ale doceniali rozmaite wsparcie jakie Indie otrzymywały od Związku Sowieckiego. Proamerykańskość BJP także nie jest absolutna; na przykład program wyborczy partii z 1996 r. krytykował Waszyngton za jego ,,brak wizji’’ polityki zagranicznej i stosunek do kwestii Kaszmiru. Tak jak ostatnie dwa rządy, gabinet Modiego wyraźnie utrzymuje równy dystans w stosunku do Moskwy i Waszyngtonu. Indie nie potępiły secesji Krymu (i ugościły rosyjską delegację, której członkiem był reprezentant Krymu) i nie potępiły rosyjskiej interwencji w Syrii. Modi w grudniu 2015 r. odwiedził Moskwę i podczas tej wizyty podpisano nowe umowy o handlu sprzętem wojskowym, mimo że 2014 r. Rosja zaskakująco zgodziła się sprzedać bojowe śmigłowce Pakistanowi.

Względem Europy priorytety Indii nie uległy zmianie. Modi odwiedził dokładnie te trzy państwa kontynentu, które mają dla jego kraju największe znaczenia gospodarcze: Niemcy, Francję i Wielkiej Brytanii. Nie widać niestety jak dotąd publicznego zainteresowania Nowego Delhi względem krajów Europy Wschodniej, takich jak Polska.

Udostępnij:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
K. Iwanek: The foreign policy of BJP. How much Modi-fication? Reviewed by on 4 stycznia 2016 .

[see below for the Polish version] As 2015 has drawn to an end and as more than a year and a half has passed since the Bharatiya Janata Party (hence  BJP) and its National Democratic Alliance swept into power in India. It is time, therefore, to offer a short summary of its foreign policy so

Udostępnij:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

O AUTORZE /

Avatar

Pozostaw odpowiedź